Schools in Saudi Arabia need urgent reforms

As the summer holidays wind down and children and parents begin a feverish rush to prepare for the new school year in Saudi Arabia, some of the outstanding issues continue to surface.


The debate continues over the quality of government-funded schools, the top-heavy bureaucracy, lack of proper facilities in schools and quite often their location.

International and privately-run schools have attempted to fill the gap at a steep price.

Parents have been busy seeking to enrol their young ones in schools that do away with all such flaws, in search of an appropriate learning haven for their children.

However, a recent incident dispels the notion that bureaucracy in private schools is any different.

International and privately-run schools have attempted to fill the gap at a steep price.

Parents have been busy seeking to enrol their young ones in schools that do away with all such flaws, in search of an appropriate learning haven for their children.

However, a recent incident dispels the notion that bureaucracy in private schools is any different.

Inconsistencies so prevalent in the bureaucratic minds of those who manage public schools can also be evident in privately-owned institutions.

The interest of the pupil is often not the primary concern.

A mother was stunned when her four-year-old son was not accepted in nursery at one of the “so-called” premier schools in Jeddah for the upcoming academic session.

The reason given by school officials for rejection was not that he had failed the entrance exam or that he did not possess the necessary qualities that the school sought from its potential students.

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